BLACK HOMESTEAD FARM
BLACK HOMESTEAD FARM
Established by Land Grant in 1821
BUILDING A HOUSE
To contact us with questions or comments: mailbox@blackhomesteadfarm.com
     "My mother and Aunt Hobson were not very well pleased with this wild looking country, but my uncle,
     James Hobson, was well satisfied with it and went to work with a good will, making preparations for
     farming. My mother's first thought was for a good house."

On April 19, 1823, Margaret Black signed a contract for brickwork on her new home with William Reay, an Englishman. The brick size was to be directed by Margaret for $6.50 per thousand bricks including cutting the wood, digging and firing the clay, burning the lime and laying the brick. William Scott was contracted to do the wood work. The total bill for the brickwork was $3000.
In his 1891 autobiography, Thomas Black recalled his family's arrival in Greene County:
Original contract to build the house between Margaret Black and William Reay
The house is a two story brick and frame federal style building with flemish bond brick construction on the original front and a gable roof. Although the front of the house now faces west, the original front faced east when constructed in 1823. The exterior walls of the house are solid brick (three bricks thick) on a native rock foundation. The current brick walls and frame portions of the house are painted white, although the original brick that was made near the site were red in color. One section of the original brick under the second story porch stairs is unpainted and reveals the original red color.
Black Homestead House Original Floor Plan
First Floor
Second Floor
Parlor
Kitchen
Dining Room
Living Room
Hall
Hall
Bedroom
Bedroom
Bedroom
Bedroom
In 1824, Margaret Black paid P. J. Hobson $354.42 for lumber and materials used to build the house.
Even with the walls as yet unplastered, Margaret Black and her four surviving children David, William, Thomas and Elizabeth moved into their new home in December 1823.

Among the possessions that were placed in the home were two pieces of furniture, a blanket chest and a sugar chest, that were brought from England during the original journey in 1822. Both pieces remain in the house today.

Blanket Chest
Sugar Chest